La présentation du Burundi

Burundi’s political system is that of a presidential representative democratic republic based upon a multi-party state. The President of Burundi is the head of state and head of government. There are currently 21 registered parties in Burundi.[11] On 13 March 1992, Tutsi coup leader Pierre Buyoya established a constitution,[12] which provided for a multi-party political process[13] and reflected multi-party competition. Six years later, on 6 June 1998, the constitution was changed, broadening National Assembly’s seats and making provisions for two vice-presidents. Because of the Arusha Accord, Burundi enacted a transitional government in 2000.[14] In October 2016, Burundi informed the UN of its intention to withdraw from the International Criminal Court.[15]

Burundi remains an overwhelmingly rural society, with just 13% of the population living in urban areas in 2013.[16] The population density of around 315 people per square kilometre (753 per sq mi) is the second highest in Sub-Saharan Africa.[11] Roughly 85% of the population are of Hutu ethnic origin, 15% are Tutsi, and fewer than 1% are indigenous Twa.[17] The official languages of Burundi are French and Kirundi, although Swahili can be found spoken along the Tanzanian border.

One of the smallest countries in Africa, Burundi has an equatorial climate. Burundi is a part of the Albertine Rift, the western extension of the East African Rift. The country lies on a rolling plateau in the centre of Africa. The highest peak, Mount Heha at 2,685 m (8,810 ft),[18] lies to the southeast of the capital, Bujumbura. The most distant source of the River Nile is the Ruvyironza River in the Bururi Province of Burundi, the Nile is linked from Lake Victoria to its headwaters via the Kagera River to the Ruvyironza River.[19][20] Another major lake is Lake Tanganyika, located in much of Burundi’s southwestern corner.[21] There are two national parks, Kibira National Park to the northwest (a small region of rain forest, adjacent to Nyungwe Forest National Park in Rwanda), and Ruvubu National Park to the northeast (along the Rurubu River, also known as Ruvubu or Ruvuvu). Both were established in 1982 to conserve wildlife populations.[22] Burundi’s lands are mostly agricultural or pasture.


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